Super Lawyers
The Netional Trial Lawyers - Top 40 Under 40
Martindale-Hubbell
Avvo Clients Choice
Avvo Top Contributor
Avvo Rating

Articles Tagged with Indiana

Published on:

pexels-mike-4639907-300x168Tyson Timbs, of Marion, IN, has been at the center of an asset forfeiture case for eight years now. His case is being heard by the Indiana Supreme Court this month, where state prosecutors are once more going to convince the court that the state should keep Timbs’ Land Rover SUV.

In 2013, he was arrested in Marion, IN, after he allegedly sold heroin to undercover officers. The accused pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of house arrest, five years of probation, and $1,200 in fines, which he paid. The state also used asset forfeiture to seize his Land Rover, which he had reportedly bought with the proceeds of his father’s life insurance policy.

Continue reading

Published on:

aleks-marinkovic-jiG6OVvVidg-unsplash-300x201A $40,000 Land Rover seized by the state of Indiana in connection with a drug crime has been returned to its owner, Tyson Timbs, pending final determination by judicial authorities as to the appropriateness of the seizure of the vehicle by law enforcement under civil asset forfeiture. This long legal battle has made it to the United States Supreme Court and twice to the Indiana Supreme Court. Mr. Timbs is represented by counsel from the Institute for Justice, which is a law firm that works on prominent public interest cases.

Continue reading

Published on:

In April, I reported on the case of Tyson Timbs. Back then, the Indiana Supreme Court upheld the 2013 seizure of his car using the process known as civil asset forfeiture. Now, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear his case and determine whether the vehicle should be returned to him.

Tyson had been living in Ohio for years, struggling with addiction. After a work injury, he became addicted to opioids. Later, he turned to heroin. Then his Aunt Wendy fell ill. Tyson moved to Marion, Indiana to look after her.
Continue reading

Published on:

A case of civil asset forfeiture involving a Hoosier’s seized Land Rover may end up on the U.S. Supreme Court’s docket. If they agree to hear the case, it could transform the approach of law enforcement to civil asset forfeiture across the nation.

Civil asset forfeiture is the process where law enforcement can seize property suspected of being involved in a crime. It is legal in most states, and few states require a criminal conviction for the property to be seized. Proceeds from the profits of civil asset forfeiture are often used to fund law enforcement, leading to accusations of policing for profit. Continue reading

Contact Information