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Articles Tagged with broward sheriffs office

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Broward sheriff’s jail deputy Oreth Smith of Plantation, Florida was arrested on March 28 for allegedly using a personal cellphone, which is considered contraband, for long periods of his work shift instead of conducting head counts, security checks, and other administrative duties.

Smith, 35, faces charges for introducing contraband into a jail and official misconduct after it was discovered he falsified inmate head count reports. He was released on bond the following day. The press did not list an attorney for Smith.

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Santiago Mayorga, a deputy with the Broward, Florida sheriff’s office, was arrested for a DUI hit-and-run crash this week. He faces charges for leaving the scene of an accident and possession of illegal drugs. Mayorga was held at Broward County Jail for one night in lieu of a $3,200 bond. A spokesperson from the sheriff’s office said Mayorga, 22, was transferred to a local hospital for evaluation on the recommendation of medical personnel at Broward County Jail. News sources did not specify a lawyer for Mayorga.

According to the arrest report, the alleged car crash occurred where Interstate 95 merges onto Copans Road at around 10:00 p.m. on July 4. Mayorga was driving his patrol car when he purportedly crashed into a 2012 Mazda driven by Penny Reynolds. Mayorga’s Ford Crown Victoria hit the rear corner of Reynolds’ car and sideswiped the driver’s side before allegedly taking off.

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Yesterday was a first for me. It was the first time I ever saw the lead detective in a murder case take the stand and testify that the accused was not guilty. It was also the first time I ever saw a prosecutor cross-examine his lead investigator and try to impeach him.

Its like we are living in bizarro world over here!

But these shockers are just the beginning. What you are about to learn will blow your mind. In fact, what I saw yesterday actually has me pretty upset. It took me a day of digesting what I saw before I could write about it. More importantly, the implications of yesterday’s testimony go far beyond the defenses in this case.

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I can almost hear the moans coming from the State Attorney’s Office this week.  Poor guys, can even a week go by without another bombshell motion being filed in the Peraza case?

Last week we learned Jermaine McBean, the man who sadly lost his life in this case, suffered from some very serious mental health problems that explain why he would walk down the street with a rifle, freaking everyone out, and then point the gun at police.

This week was even worse – we learned that Deputy Peraza has actually been immune from prosecution the entire time. No, not because he wears a badge, but because his case presents a textbook example of Stand Your Ground immunity under Florida law.

Earlier this week, Deputy Peraza’s attorney, Eric Schwartzreich, filed a Motion to Dismiss citing immunity from prosecution in accordance with Florida’s Stand Your Ground laws. The motion is public record and is available on the Broward Clerk’s website. You can also read it here: Motion to Dismiss (Stand Your Ground)

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I am so utterly disgusted with the prosecution of this case.  If you thought Deputy Peraza was innocent before, wait until you hear about the Motion to Compel Mental Health Records filed by his attorney, Eric Schwartzreich, yesterday.  It is public record and you can read it for yourself from the Clerk’s website, just like I did.

According to the motion, Jermaine McBean, the man who unfortunately lost his life in this incident, was suffering from a major mental health breakdown on the day of the shooting. In fact, family members told the New York Times and NBC News that McBean had a history for mental illness and was hospitalized a few days before the shooting because he stopped taking his medication.

The motion also describes McBean’s mental breakdown at work SIX DAYS before the shooting. During this work event, paramedics were called out and McBean was taken to the hospital for emergency psychiatric treatment.

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